Tag Archives: holocaust

Lon’s Puppet Show


① memo 20170729 ~ Lon’s Puppet Show ~ The Antwerp avant garde artist ‘Lon’ Leon Landau made a puppet theater for the children in the Kazerne Dossin transit camp , with 12 puppets like this rebellious character ‘Robin Hood’ filmed here , and eg Till Eulenspiegel (Tijl Uilenspiegel) – but Lon was deported to Auschwitz in 1944 , before the puppet show could took place.
He was a rebel himself , one of the people that hid the tools under the straw on the floor of the cattle cars to help escape the deportees on Transport XX. Interview with Janiv Stamberger ( researcher Kazerne Dossin ) filmed August 18, 2016 at the Wiki Loves Art event in Kazerne Dossin , Mechelen , Belgium.

Transit Camp Mechelen


① memo 20170727 ~ Transit Camp Mechelen ~ Today 75 years ago on July 27, 1942 the “SS-Sammellager Mechelen” collection and deportation camp was opened in the former barracks “Kazerne Dossin”. The building now houses the Kazerne Dossin memorial , filmed here in 2013 – Mechelen , Belgium.

Settela 1′


One minute slow-motion of the moment the 9-year-old Settela Steinbach peeks outside in the cattle car door opening on the Westerbork death train bound for Auschwitz – May 19 , 1944 . ① memo 20170725 Michel van der Burg – michelvanderburg.com | 1-memo.com
( unbranded version of video added today to the archives of The One Minutes / Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision )

Settela


① memo 20170721 ~ Settela ~ The 9-year-old dutch Sinti-girl Anna Maria ‘Settela’ Steinbach peeks outside , at the last moment just before the sliding door is closed , standing inside a freight wagon with 74 people on May 19 , 1944 in the Westerbork concentration camp in Holland , when this deportation train leaves for Auschwitz-Birkenau – where Settela is murdered a few months later in one of the gas chambers. Here she wears a headscarf made from a torn sheet, because the Nazis had her head shaved , and while Settela peeks outside , her mother cries behind her in the car : “Get out of there, or soon your head gets in between!”
She was filmed by the jewish prisoner filmmaker Rudolf Breslauer as part of a documentary film being made on the Westerbork camp. More info here http://romasinti.eu/#story/settela-steinbach
In this short film I start with a slow-motion (10x) of the 3 seconds clip, followed by the unedited clip from the Westerbork 1944 film rushes / Rudolf Breslauer / Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision (Open Images)

The Last Witnesses


① memo 20170520 ~ The Last Witnesses ~ Closing ceremony at the presentation of the dutch book “De Laatste Getuigen” telling the stories of over 80 survivors ( ISBN 9789054877370 ) with a panel discussion with the survivors Staf Schaerlackens , Max De Vries , Elisabeth ‘Lieske’ Vossen , and Evrard Voorpijls , and presentations by Marc Van Roosbroeck (chairman of vzw “De werkgroep 10 december 2008”) , Gert De Nutte (publisher ASP) Rudi Beken , Herman Vandormael, and Patrick Dewael (mayor of Tongeren) on 20 May 2011 , Tongeren , Belgium

Crescendo A Cappella – Al Kol Ele


① memo 20170428 ~ Crescendo A Cappella — Al Kol Ele ~ The Crescendo Boortmeerbeek Choir sings “Al Kol Ele” a cappella during the Transport XX commemoration May 15 , 2011 in Boortmeerbeek , Belgium – Film : Michel van der Burg – michelvanderburg.com | 1-memo.com

Zog nit keynmol – Cartouche


Video published on Apr 19, 2017 – Partison Song – Zog nit keynmol (Ne dis jamais) est le nom de la chanson écrite en 1943 par Hirsh Glick, jeune juif détenu au ghetto de Vilnius apprenant le soulèvement du ghetto de Varsovie contre les nazis. La mélodie est du russe Dmitry Pokrass écrite en 1935

Background *
‘Zog nit keynmol az du geyst dem letstn veg’ (Never say that you are walking the final road), also known as ‘The Partisans’ Song’, is perhaps the best-known of the Yiddish songs created during the Holocaust. It was written by the young Vilna poet Hirsh Glik, and based on a pre-existing melody by the Soviet-Jewish composer Dimitri Pokrass. Inspired by the news of the Warsaw ghetto uprising, the song was adopted as the official anthem of the Vilna partisans shortly after it was composed in 1943, and spread with remarkable rapidity to other ghettos and camps. The song is powerful and defiantly optimistic, acknowledging Jewish suffering in the past and present, and urging the Jewish people to continue fighting for their survival. It is one of the most frequently performed songs at Holocaust commemoration ceremonies.

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