Tag Archives: afghan

Béguinage Refugees Into The Wild

Béguinage Refugees Into The Wild ~ Posters in the Brussels streets of Afghan refugees living in the Brussels Béguinage church in 2014. Portraits by Chiara Ravano (Antwerp) for the Inside Out project “Justice for afghan refugees in Belgium” (Olivier Bonny, Salon Mommen) in the front of the Salon Mommen, Saint-Josse/ Sint-Joost , Brussels , Belgium.
① memo 20160620 ~ Film : Michel van der Burg | 1-memo.com
#WithRefugees – World Refugee Day

Justice ! Successful solidarity march for Afghan refugees in Brussels

Justice! Very successful solidarity march by Belgians and Afghans for the Afghan refugees in Brussels , today 2 years ago (20 nov 2013). Many are now regularized.

Belgians and Afghan refugees march for justice – Brussels 20 nov 2013

Justice!  Very successful solidarity march by Belgians and Afghans for the Afghan refugees in Brussels , today 2 years ago (20 nov 2013). Many are now regularized. One of these refugees I know – Kamran – recently got visa for his wife and kids to come to Belgium. He started just days ago a fresh start for his family in Belgium .. and a gofundme campaign for some help for his family — while he himself is helping tonight newcomers in the rainy streets of Brussels.

Video report Afghans & Belgians « We want justice »

Background (together with my NY partner Kristen Cattell) in the Beguinage church in Brussels.

Afghan refugees in Brussels – Beguinage Project

 May 28th, 2014 report* from the Afghan refugees camp in the Saint John the Baptist church at the Béguinage in Brussels (Belgium) – click 1st image to start slideshow

Beguinage Project

In March 2014 I traveled to Brussels, Belgium to meet a group of Afghans living inside an old Catholic church. At the time, nearly one hundred Afghan refugees had set up camp within the walls of the seventeenth century compound. There were camping tents and make-shift walls within the Baroque interior. Respectfully abiding by the teachings of Islam, the main religious practice of the Afghans living in the Catholic church, there was one side for woman and children and one side for males.

Their shoes were piled up outside of the doors of their tents and warm pots of chai were passed around during mealtime. On a sunny afternoon dozens joined in on a game of cricket, cautious to not start a scene or cause too much noise. All they could do at this point was wait for a potential interview date and hope to receive legal status in a country that they could only half-heartedly call home.

A majority of the males I spoke with were well-educated; most speaking French, Dutch, and English in addition to their native Afghan language of Dari or Pashto. Their skills and experiences as translators, guards, and service men in Afghanistan had threatened their livelihood and ultimately forced them to flee their homeland. The priest of the church, Daniel Alliet, opened the space to the Afghan refugees because he disagreed with Belgium’s asylum policy.

One Afghan gentleman, who asked to remain anonymous, told me about his journey to Brussels: “When you are working with America or other organizations in Afghanistan the Taliban is a big problem. I was with the forces in Kandahar Province for one year. This was a big, big company in Kandahar. After one year the Taliban send some letters to my family saying, ‘Your son is working for the enemy.’ And they said, ‘He will come and he will work with us.’ Then I went to my home. And after the Taliban found out about me, I came to Iran, then I went to Europe, and this country.”

At present, the situation continues to evolve: the church is now used as an Afghan community center instead of a shelter, some have been granted alternative housing accommodations throughout the country, and many refugees were granted the right to stay in the country legally. In Brussels, and around the world, Afghans are facing the harsh realities of displacement while others are struggling to resettle without official resident status, nevertheless, their strength is what binds them and they tirelessly continue to fight for justice.

Text: Kristen Cattell / Photography : Michel van der Burg

Special thanks to Isabelle Marchal and the many friends that welcomed us , and also others whose works were on display at the church and are shown in these pictures.

* Update Sept 6th 2015 – Our full report first appeared May 28th, 2014 (via the now no longer existing web site “Rising Afghans”) and is now fully included here.
Republishing of the short second photo report that appeared also then , will follow soon (the Inside Out project by JR – with original portraits by Chiara Ravano – at Salon Mommen, Brussels.)

Update Nov 15, 2015 – Added video “Béguinage shadows”

Update Nov 19, 2015 – Added info (below) on the  silent solidarity march for Afghan refugees in Brussels Nov 20th 2013 – “Belgians and Afghans demand justice”

Belgians and Afghans demand justice

Belgians and Afghans demand justice – Video report by Michel van der Burg. Belgians and Afghan refugees demand Belgium changes its asylum policy.
Speeches by Amir Mohammad Jafari (12 y, student and Afghan refugee in Belgium) & Simon Gronowski (Belgian lawyer) 20 nov 2013 on the arrival of the silent solidarity march for Afghan refugees in Brussels. « link to full post »

Afghans & Belgians « We want justice »

Afghans & Belgians  « We want justice »  Belgen en Afghanen eisen rechtvaardigheid. Zij eisen van België een rechtvaardiger asielbeleid. Image Rémi Dalvio / Michel van der Burg

Afghans & Belgians « We want justice » Belgen en Afghanen eisen rechtvaardigheid. Zij eisen van België een rechtvaardiger asielbeleid. Image Rémi Dalvio / Michel van der Burg

Video with English captions | sous-titres Français | Nederlandse ondertitels:

 

Start video
>> click ‘CC’ >> ON
>> option English  /  FR & NL (Français + Nederlands)

Or – for better quality  on mobile devices   watch on YouTube HERE

NL – Belgen en Afghanen eisen rechtvaardigheid. Zij eisen van België een rechtvaardiger asielbeleid. Toespraken Amir Mohammad Jafari (12 jaar, scholier en Afghaanse vluchteling in België) & Simon Gronowski (advocaat, 82, Belg) 20 nov 2013 bij aankomst van de stille solidariteitsmars voor Afghaanse vluchtelingen in Brussel (België). Foto (Gronowski) : Rémi Dalvio. Bedankt Philippe Renette (België) voor de vertaling in het Frans van de speech van Amir. Reportage – video : Michel van der Burg (michelvanderburg.com)

EN – Belgians and Afghans demand justice. They demand Belgium changes its asylum policy.
Speeches by Amir Mohammad Jafari (12 y, student and Afghan refugee in Belgium) & Simon Gronowski (Belgian lawyer) 20 nov 2013 on the arrival of the silent solidarity march for Afghan refugees in Brussels (Belgium). Photo (Gronowski) : Rémi Dalvio. Thank you Philippe Renette (Belgium) for the translation of the speech of Amir in French. Report – video : Michel van der Burg (michelvanderburg.com)

FR – Des Belges et Afghans demandent justice. Ils demandent la Belgique modifie sa politique d’asile. Discours par Amir Mohammad Jafari (12 ans, élève et réfugié Afghan à la Belgique) et Simon Gronowski (avocat, 82, Belge) 20 novembre 2013 sur l’arrivée de la Marche silencieuse de solidarité pour les réfugiés Afghans à Bruxelles (Belgique). Photo (Gronowski) : Rémi Dalvio. Merci Philippe Renette (Belgique) pour la traduction du discours de Amir en français. Reportage – vidéo : Michel van der Burg (michelvanderburg.com)

NL – Speech (toespraak) Amir Mohammad Jafari**

Geachte mevrouw De Block en alle inwoners van dit land.

Ik ben Amir Mohammad Jafari, 12 jaar.

Ik ben de stem van alle kinderen en jongeren zonder papieren.

Inwoners van dit land, mevrouw De Block, eigenlijk wil ik maar één ding: meeleven!

Graag nodig ik jullie uit om :

– één dag in mijn schoenen te staan

– één dag in een vreemde taal naar school te gaan

– één dag in de wenende ogen van mijn mama te kijken

– één dag niet zeker te zijn of je die dag iets te eten zal hebben

– één dag schrik te hebben dat de politie je uit het huis zal zetten

– één dag de afschuwelijke beelden uit ons thuisland op tv te zien

– één dag het gevoel te hebben dat niemand naar je luistert

– één dag mijn nachtmerries te hebben

– één dag je post niet te willen lezen

– om één dag de enige te zijn die het slechte nieuws aan je ouders kan vertellen

– om één dag illegaal genoemd te worden.

Maar ook één dag…
één dag hier gelukkig te mogen zijn.

Alvast bedankt!

FR – Traduction du discours de Amir Mohammad Jafari en français

Chère madame De Block – habitants de ce pays.

Je m’appelle Amir Mohammad Jafari. J’ai 12 ans.

Je suis la voix de tous les enfants et de tous les jeunes sans papiers.

Habitants de ce pays, Madame De Block, en fait, je ne souhaite qu’une seule chose : de la compassion!

Je vous invite volontiers à :

– partager mon sort pendant rien qu’une journée

– suivre pendant une seule journée les cours dans une langue étrangère

– regarder pendant une seule journée dans les yeux en larmes de votre maman

– vous demander un jour si vous aurez à manger le lendemain

– ressentir pendant une seule journée la peur de vous faire expulser par la police

– voir un jour des images affreuses de votre pays d’origine à la télévision

– avoir rien qu’un jour le sentiment que personne ne vous écoute

– faire pendant une seule journée les cauchemars que je fais

– ne pas vouloir lire sa correspondance

– etre un jour le seul qui peut annoncer la mauvaise nouvelle à ses parents

– etre appelé un jour illégal.

Mais aussi un jour …
un seul jour être heureux ici.

Merci d’avance! “

Speech  – declaration – delivered (in French) by Simon Gronowski in Brussels, Nov 20, 2013**
FR – Discours – déclaration – par Simon Gronowski à Bruxelles, le 20 Novembre 2013

“Je m’appelle Simon Gronowski.

Depuis des années, je témoigne partout contre la barbarie nazie.

Partout je dis que mon père, en 1920, a quitté sa Pologne natale, fuyant l’antisémitisme et la misère et est entré en Belgique en fraude, en clandestin.

C’était un “sans papier” avant la lettre, un réfugié politique et économique.

A l’époque, il a été bien accueilli en Belgique et rapidement régularisé.

Voilà pourquoi je dis partout que je suis solidaire des “sans papiers”.

Ils ne viennent pas ici pour leur plaisir mais car dans leur pays ils ont faim ou ils ont des problèmes politiques.

Mais ils n’ont rien fait de mal et il ne faut pas les mettre en prison, dans des centres appelés “127Bis”.

Et surtout pas les enfants, car moi on m’a mis en 1943 à onze ans dans une prison: la Caserne Dossin à Malines.

Je suis solidaire de la situation actuelle des Afghans en Belgique.

La sécurité dans leur pays est loin d’être vérifiée et leur vie y serait en danger, surtout quand en 2014 les troupes internationales partiront.

En attendant il faut suspendre l’expulsion de tous les Afghans et leur accorder un permis de séjour, pour eux, leur famille et leurs enfants.

Beaucoup de jeunes Afghans sont déjà scolarisés depuis des années, ne connaissent plus leur pays d’origine, mais seulement leur seul pays, la Belgique.

Je demande que mon pays, la Belgique, conformément à sa tradition, les traite avec humanité et leur assure une vie paisible dans la dignité.”

Continue reading